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Douglas' ‘Great Principle.’

2

August 18, 1858.

In his speech in the Senate, December 9th, 1857, Mr. Douglas said:
"During the last Congress I reported a bill from the Committee on Territories to authorize the people of Kansas to assemble and form a Constitution for themselves. Subsequently the Senator from Georgia [Mr. Toombs] brought forward a substitute for my bill, which, after having been modified by him and myself in consultation, was passed by the Senate."
This bill of Senator Toombs' provided for a submission of the Constitution of Kansas to a vote of the people. How Senator Douglas "modified" it may be seen by the following extracts:

Toomb's Bill. Douglas' Bill.
13th section of the Toombs' bill -- "That the following proposition be, and the same are hereby offered to the said Convention of the people of Kansas, when formed, for their free acceptance or rejection, which, if accepted or rejection, which, if accepted by the Convention, and ratified by the people at the election for the adoption of the Constitution, shall be obligatory on the United States, and upon the said State of Kansas," &c.
19th section of Douglas' amended bill -- "That the following propositions be, and the same are hereby offered to the said Convention of the people of Kansas, for their free acceptance or rejection, which, if accepted by the Convention, shall be obligatory on the United States and upon the said State of Kansas," &c.

Here "the great principle" of the Toombs' bill is stricken out by Mr. Douglas' own hand. What shall be said of the hypocricy of Douglas, who is now going around among the people of Illinois and talking about his devotion to the "great principle of popular sovereignty."

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