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Letter from Colonel Tash to the New-Hampshire Committee of Safety

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COLONEL TASH TO THE NEW-HAMPSHIRE COMMITTEE OF SAFETY.

Peakskill, in Cortland Manor, October 26, 1776.

This comes to acquaint your Honours that I arrived at Hartford, in Connecticut, the 2d instant, and one company the same day, which I sent forward next morning, and likewise I sent Colonel Welch off the same day, with, a letter to General Washington acquainting him that I was at Hartford, and expected the whole of my regiment to be there in three or four days, and should send the companies off for New-York as fast as they got here, and should follow them after the last company had arrived. I likewise let him know we had no camp equipage, such as pots, kettles; neither was it in the power of the State of New-Hampshire to procure any, as there was no tin to be had. I also transmitted a copy of my orders to him. I set off from Hartford the 8th instant, and all the companies had gone forward excepting Captain Prescot, and I thought I would wait no longer for him, and left orders for him to follow as fast as possible. When I arrived at Stamford Colonel Welch was there, and brought me a letter from General Washington, directing me to procure quarters for my regiment and Colonel Baldwin' s at Stamford and Horse-Neck, but to have the major part at Horse-Neck if quarters could be procured for them. He likewise directed me to furnish ourselves with camp utensils from the inhabitants if possible. I applied to the Committee to furnish me with pots, &c˙, but Colonel Baldwin had got there before me, and had got almost all to be had; they made out to get me three, and I sent round for several miles and procured a small number more, by advancing the cash in hand for them. The 13th instant, early in the morning, received orders by express from General Sullivan to march my regiment to King' s Bridge, with all possible speed, and likewise to acquaint Colonel Baldwin that he must march likewise. Accordingly we got wagons to carry our baggage ready about two o' clock, p˙ m˙, and got the whole to Horse-Neck Sunday night, nine o' clock. Sunday night, the 13th instant, received a letter by express from General Washington, to march my regiment to Fish-kill, as the Convention was there sitting, in such a difficult situation, with regard to the numbers of disaffected persons in many Counties in this State, that they could not trust their own Militia so well as ours; therefore ordered me to march with all possible speed to said Fishkill, which I did the next morning, and sent a letter to the General acquainting him of the same. Before I got to Fishkill received a letter by express from the Congress, that they did not want but two companies; but I had got them within two miles of the place, so that it was too late to go back that night; so I went forward and waited on the Congress, and let them know my orders; and the President, Mr˙ Livingston, said he was sorry we come so far, that is the whole regiment, but desired I would send back to stop the remainder, and turn them back to Peakskill, where we must remain till further orders, to guard the shores, to stop the men-of-war' s people landing to carry off cattle, and leave two companies there, which I did, under the command of Colonel Welch; and the remainder I have posted from this place, about eight miles down the river, to watch the motions of the enemy, and sent a letter to General Washington, acquainting him of my route, and the orders I had received of the Congress, and how I had posted my regiment. And he wrote back very friendly, and told me I must be under the immediate direction of the Convention of this State, with regard to marching the regiment, or any part, to any place till further orders. I have nothing further at present, as you know the news full as well as I; therefore would beg

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leave to subscribe myself your. Honour' s most obedient humble servant,

THOMAS TASH.

To the honourable the Committee of Safety for the State of New-Hampshire.

P˙ S˙ Colonel Baldwin is at the White-Plains with his regiment, and the main body of the army is there. The regiment I command is almost all in good health and high spirits.

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