Primary tabs

Extract of a Letter from Annapolis to a Gentleman in New-York

v1:1208

EXTRACT OF A LETTER FROM ANNAPOLIS TO A GENTLEMAN IN NEW-YORK, DATED FEBRUARY, 1775.

Oblige me by tendering my thanks to Mr˙ Rivington for the "Alarm," which I received as soon as it was possible, after its publication. Several copies were distributed among our leading Patriots, who were alarmed sufficiently. Johnson, by far the most shrewd and sagacious amongst them, declared that the political salvation of America, depended on the present conduct of your Legislature; — and I think so too. Oh, my good friend, could it but be that they would break their chains and shew us the way, by only declaring aloud, what every man, in private, must think, that those Congressmen and their satellites, the Committee-men, are the truest, though absurdest tyrants that any country ever had cause to complain of; depend upon it, we should follow them in shoals. There wants but a head: the foolishest and maddest are tired of their projects; and were it not that their leaders, with horrid cunning, have rendered a retreat so difficult, I foresee thousands anxious for a defection; and yet, what are the difficulties that would attend a return to their duty and allegiance compared with the dismal, the unutterable distresses which must of necessity be the final portion of such unhappy men as shall blindly or wickedly persevere in their present line of conduct.

Share